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Sea Links

November 27, 2009
tags:

Special French Mistral News

 

French warship in Russia amid talks on landmark sale.

French ship Russia wants to buy in St Petersburg.

Millions of euros at stake over French helicopter carrier ship deal.

French Ship Sale to Russia Must Be Blown Off Course.

Putin’s France visit sparks alarm over possible warship purchase.

Russia Has No Reason To Buy Cumbersome and Useless French Warship.

The Mistral Comes to Town.

Wanted: Big Amphibious Ships.

The Mistral Sale Madness: Why Russia Is Buying French Ships.

Note-Photo is of the French Tonnerre, sistership to the Mistral amphibious assault helicopter carrier currently visiting Russia.

*****

US Navy

 

Petraeus visits USS Nimitz for Thanksgiving.

The Other LCS Aces Sea Trials. More.

Welcome aboard the Ike.

Navy: Newest carrier will be ready in 2015.

Raytheon to support Zumwalt-class. More.

Military plans aircraft carrier in Apra Harbor.

*****

Warships of the World

 

Iran’s Navy: From Guerrilla Warfare to Modern Naval Strategy. (pdf)

Israel readying new arms to meet Iran challenge.

Report: Israeli navy to join NATO Mediterranean mission.

BAE systems to create plans for new Frigates. More. More.

Hunter killer sub Astute Arrives at her Home Port.

UK navy fires on ‘Spanish flag’.

Indonesian Navy to beef up fleet’s arsenal.

Dutch, Chinese navies meet at sea.

China’s Noisy Nuclear Submarines.

Yushchenko pledges to force Russian navy out of Crimea.

New helicopter destroyer to widen MSDF range.

***** 

Tackling Pirates

 

India deploys warship in Seychelles, Mauritius waters.

The Truth Behind the Boom of Piracy.

Canadian warship takes up anti piracy duties off the coast of east Africa.

Combating Somali pirates at the seas.

Pyrates on Parade — Part 1.

*****

 

From the Navy Vaults

Free to a good home: USS John F. Kennedy. (Philly.com)

Nelson’s Battles: The Triumph of British Sea Power. (Strategypage)

Passing of the World War One generation marked by Britain. (Royal Navy)

Fierce gale helps Admiral Sir Edward Hawke launch attack. (Times Online)

Log book’s discovery reveals how Navy caught up with Bounty mutineer. (Times Online)

Britain’s Bold Strike from the Sea. (War and Game)

Cuxhaven Raid in Consideration. (War and Game)

*****

17 Comments leave one →
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  4. D. E. Reddick permalink
    November 30, 2009 1:11 am

    B.Smitty,

    Thanks for the correction!

    Let’s see, there are various 20, 23, 25, 27, 30, 35, 37, and 40 mm cannon available in the light to near medium range of weaponry. Did I leave off any available caliber of auto-cannon? It gets to be a bit difficult remembering which is which and what is exactly what.

  5. B.Smitty permalink
    November 29, 2009 10:11 pm

    That’s a 35mm Millennium gun on the bow, not a 27mm.

  6. D. E. Reddick permalink
    November 29, 2009 5:01 pm

    Given our discussions of the competing LCS designs and the incredibly interesting FSF-1 Sea Fighter, then why haven’t we also been discussing Sea Slice? I just noticed that it was mentioned over at ID. This too looks like a possible pirate-busting small warship. That’s a 27 mm cannon up front and what appears to be twin 12.75 inch ASW torpedo launchers abaft the superstructure. And some pictures of her show three mission modules while others have no such modules embarked. Seems she is mission-configurable.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_Slice

    http://snafu-solomon.blogspot.com/2009/11/sea-slicewhat-happened-to-her.html

  7. November 29, 2009 11:45 am

    “They were built in large quantities because metal and manpower were plentiful, and because the political situation was such that people would put up with being crammed into a tiny ship for months on end. None of that holds true today.”

    Wartime accounts would suggest you were drier in a submarine; at least submarines surfaced occasionally…… :)

    Flowers were more about presence; merchant men saw the navy was there to defend even though it was a charade. (A bit harsh but I have to be quick.) Remember convoys are about concentrating shipping to denude the oceans, not about concentrating defence. Type VII U-boats were quicker and it good be argued better seaboats than Flowers; even if the submarines rolled a tad.

    Of course you have to be careful how you interpret your history. It easy for us to sit with our documents and say that based on numbers the U-boat war wasn’t going to win the war. (A bit broad that….) But to my grandparents it seemed the U-boat was that numerous you could walk to the US on them and that every convoy was sunk; when in reality 9 out of 10 never saw a U-boat and even if a U-boat(s) were accounted the balance of the merchant men escaped. But my grandparent’s and their generation lived in genuine fear.

    Saying all that I am still Flower fan. I would love to visit that one in Canada. Must watch the Cruel Sea again.

  8. Tarl permalink
    November 29, 2009 10:25 am

    Where are the small boys which were likely the most influential in providing us this unmatched sea dominance in the World War? Then they were everywhere, guarding our commerce, battling U-boats, defending the giant ships from small but still lethal threats.

    Elsewhere you scoff at the big carrier as an example of last-century, industrial age warfare. Frankly, the plethora of small corvettes (Flower class etc.) they built in WW2 are an even better example of a dated, industrial age approach. They were built in large quantities because metal and manpower were plentiful, and because the political situation was such that people would put up with being crammed into a tiny ship for months on end. None of that holds true today.

    “Lots of small boys” is an example from the past, not the way of the future.

  9. Mike Burleson permalink*
    November 29, 2009 7:49 am

    Campbell-“Huge costs of warship construction and fuel will gradually bring a change”

    Absolutely! Most of the warship programs underway are more for prestige than practicality. What is the world’s most powerful Navy? The USN as seen by its fleet of aircraft carriers, nuclear submarines, and large amphibious warships. But getting to this point was much more than giants ships which can remain on station longer, deploy to any part of the world, and strike terror into our enemies.

    Creating a global fleet was a team effort of all types of ships. Where are the small boys which were likely the most influential in providing us this unmatched sea dominance in the World War? Then they were everywhere, guarding our commerce, battling U-boats, defending the giant ships from small but still lethal threats. In peacetime, there were useful and economical patrol vessels. Now they have almost vanished except for this bloated, underarmed frigate wannabee LCS (patrol boat weapon, size of a frigate, cost of a destroyer) which will likely not be purchased in the numbers promised.

  10. November 29, 2009 3:49 am

    elgatoso:

    Indeed. I generally stay out of the “such ‘n such a hull is better” arguments. The advantages of modern, all solid shell, amphibious, solar/biofueled airships are so many that it’s difficult to define them in comments.
    What is ironic is that those same advantages are available, now; with off-the-shelf technologies for the most part. Huge costs of warship construction and fuel will gradually bring a change…….

  11. Tarl permalink
    November 27, 2009 7:42 pm

    Berthing a carrier at Guam… baaaaaad idea. Roughly equivalent to basing the Pacific Fleet in Manila rather than Pearl Harbor in 1941.

    Chinese won’t need an anti-ship ballistic missile to smoke that sucker. They could nail it with any missile that can hit a fixed target. Anything that can hit an airfield can hit a carrier that’s docked. Buh-bye.

  12. November 27, 2009 4:32 pm

    “Mr X, thats because the complaints further their cause to get back “the Rock”! Obviously, they are actively seeking this, referring to actions with Spanish ships in the waters nearby.”

    I know. Perhaps they should consider that chunk of Portugal they snaffled. And what about there two North African colonies.

    Of course being Europeans the democratic wishes of the Gibraltarains are completed ignore!!!!!!!!

  13. Mike Burleson permalink*
    November 27, 2009 2:30 pm

    Mr X, thats because the complaints further their cause to get back “the Rock”! Obviously, they are actively seeking this, referring to actions with Spanish ships in the waters nearby.

  14. November 27, 2009 2:18 pm

    The Spanish……..

    Complain about single hull tankers and SSNs calling at Gibraltar. Yet not a peep when the same vessels visit Spanish ports.

  15. Matthew S. permalink
    November 27, 2009 2:16 pm

    Wow if the Russians make the Mistral purchase they are going to have to butcher that ship to add in the typical Russian armament. Where are the VLS, CIWS , anti-shipping missiles supposed to be mounted?

  16. elgatoso permalink
    November 27, 2009 1:02 pm

    Maybe is time to begin to listen to Campbell.

  17. Hudson permalink
    November 27, 2009 10:39 am

    Under US Navy links, Other LCS, we learn of additional deficiencies of the new class of ships. They aren’t equipped to take pallets at sea. No problem. They will use the LCS helos. Sounds like no sweat in unstable weather with wildly swinging pallets.

    Worse, with its high speed, LCS is a potential whale killer. So extra watches will be required to guard against such a ghastly event. Besides a dead whale, the lighter than average LCS can expect serious hull damage from such a collision. Whale killing, of course, will bring out Green Peace to sea to protest. LCS, with its superior speed, assuming its hull has been repaired, will just step on the gas and high tail it.

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