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From Ship to Shore

January 15, 2010

Eagle1 and Think Defence posted some interesting photos revealing how the Navy will funnel supplies into disaster stricken Haiti, even with broken ports. Above is another focusing on the Joint Logistics Over the Shore (JLOTS) system (2003 photo), with the following caption:

The U.S. Navy’s Elevated Causeway System-Modular (ELCAS-M) stands completed at Camp Patriot. ELCAS (M) is an expeditionary pier used to bridge the surf zone, providing an interface between cargo vessels and the beach. Constructed by the U.S. Navy Seabees this 1,400-foot pier is being used to support Joint Logistics Over the Shore (JLOTS), and the back-load of what will be thousands of cargo containers holding military supplies and equipment returning home from Operation Iraqi Freedom. Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Joseph Krypel.

8 Comments leave one →
  1. Mike Burleson permalink*
    January 17, 2010 7:47 am

    Ok Scott.

  2. Scott B. permalink
    January 17, 2010 4:35 am

    Sorry for the triple post on Kin Red. Third time is a charm though. Please delete the first two.

  3. Scott B. permalink
    January 17, 2010 4:34 am

    leesea said : “ScottB you are looking at the wrong photo. In fact I do not think I have seen one of the Kin Red beach.”

    (comment originally posted here)

    Nope, this is Kin Red : another pic (without Westpac Express) can be found here.

    The caption that comes with the pic posted over at Navsource is this :

    “Westpac Express (HSV-4676) departing “Kin Red”, Red Beach on the east coast of Okinawa. Kin Red is the principal HSV loading pier for Marine troops and vehicles. This photo shows the concrete pier with the pilings leading out from it. The HSV backs into the pier and ties up to the pilings, lowers its stern ramp and conducts its load/discharge. Note: also that WestPac Express is the only HSV with an axial stern ramp, the others have quarter ramps with less capacity and cannot load as much ro/ro cargo.”

    Apparently, the source for this photo is a certain Lee Wahler… ;-)

  4. Scott B. permalink
    January 17, 2010 4:05 am

    Another pic of Westpac Express at Kin Red :

    Image: 051010-M-0596N-002

    Caption says : “Kin Red Port, Okinawa, Japan (Oct. 10, 2005) – A landing support specialist directs a High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) driver aboard the high-speed vessel Westpac Express at Kin Red Port in Okinawa.”

  5. Scott B. permalink
    January 17, 2010 3:47 am

    Solomon said : “Considering the mess that is Haiti, I don’t think that 18 days will count against it.”

    I suspect that this blog entry on ELCAS-M is somehow connected to the *JHVS is the future of the USMC” mantra often professed on Mike’s blog.

    See for instance this previous blog entry.

  6. January 17, 2010 2:10 am

    Considering the mess that is Haiti, I don’t think that 18 days will count against it. I bet that port is more jacked up than many realize. How many months do you think it will take to get that operational? So many competing priorities…feeding 3 million people, maintaining order, providing housing…all that while maintaining the flow of supplies into the country will make harbor/port repair difficult. Looking back on this 18 days might be considered quick.

  7. Scott B. permalink
    January 16, 2010 6:24 pm

    B. Smitty said : Given how many days it takes to set up ELCAS, I would’ve hoped it’d be on the first ship down there.”

    Good point. For instance, in the case of Camp Patriot :

    “Construction began April 1, and the now completed 1,400-foot pier was completed April 18.”

    .

  8. B.Smitty permalink
    January 16, 2010 12:02 pm

    Are they actually sending INLSs or ELCAS? Given how many days it takes to set up ELCAS, I would’ve hoped it’d be on the first ship down there.

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