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Sea Links

January 22, 2010
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The Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) manuevers off the coast of Haiti.

US Navy

Navy preparing for long haul in Haiti.

U.S. Navy Second Fleet Responds for Haiti Relief.

Opinion:Let’s Have a Fleet of 15 Hospital Ships.

Never-used Superferry vessel mobilized to aid Haiti relief effort.

Admiral says Haiti disaster highlights need for carrier outside of Norfolk.

US Navy fleet in high demand.

Widespread problems found on LPDs, other ships.

LCS-2 USS Independence Commissioned. More. More.

US Nuclear Sub visits Gibraltar.

*****

Warships of the World

Future British Frigate Takes Shape.

UK’s First Sea Lord to defend Royal Navy. The Speech.

U.K. Budget Cuts May Target Royal Navy Amphib Vessels.

China navy report mistakenly posted on web. Full Report.

India’s maritime challenges in the 21st century.

India Steams Ahead With Two Carriers.

India’s Sub force depleting.

JSS-Dutch Builds Canada’s Navy Dream Ship.

Italian Carrier Cavour Heads to Haiti.

Russian Navy to receive new carrier-based fighters MiG-29K.

*****

New Wars at Sea

Indonesia`s new corvette backs UNIFIL mission.

Turkish navy rescues Indian ship from Somali pirates.

Pirates trade shots with rivals, call for help.

Opinion:Don’t send pirates tribute, send the Navy.

Pirate attacks up sharply in 2009.

*****

From the Navy Vaults

The Galleon that Conquered the World. (Pauline’s Pirates & Privateers)

The Smuggler’s Craft. (Pauline’s Pirates & Privateers)

General Ship Types. (Cog and Galley)

Haiti Related: Wars of Toussaint L’Overture. (War and Game)

Remembering the father of the Canadian Navy. (Kemptville EMP)

10 Comments leave one →
  1. Mike Burleson permalink*
    January 27, 2010 4:27 am

    D.E. fixed the link on the Nork story which didn’t work.

  2. D. E. Reddick permalink
    January 26, 2010 10:08 pm

    Here’s another report regarding the challenge facing the medical staff and crew of USNS Comfort anchored off Port-au-Prince. The call for activating Comfort’s sister-ship USNS Mercy resounds stronger and stronger the more is learned regarding the critical medical situation being faced in earthquake-struck Haiti. There is a series of videos included with this report and they provide a view of how Comfort’s deployment has developed (just play the first one and let them roll on, although the order of videos is in reverse – date & timewise).

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2010-01-27-1Acomfort27_CV_N.htm

    Haiti’s ‘floating hospital’: Tough questions on USNS Comfort

    By Steve Sternberg, USA TODAY
    ABOARD THE USNS COMFORT — Yvelot Brianville, 24, lies quietly on a steel hospital gurney, a boyish naval officer in blue combat fatigues standing by his side.

    The officer, Lt. Cmdr. Mill Etienne, 34, is Haitian, fluent in Creole. He is also a neurologist, called to the intensive-care ward of this floating U.S. Navy hospital just off the coast of Port-au-Prince to assess the impact of Haiti’s earthquake on one man’s spine.

    He finds that Brianville is paralyzed from the chest down. When Etienne gently breaks the news, Brianville begins to cry.

    “That’s hard news for anybody,” says Lt. Robyn Reynolds, a nurse, coming to console him.

    Haiti’s hard news keeps coming. Patients board the hospital ship every day. More than six days into the Comfort’s mission here, more than 450 patients are on board — people who were crushed under rubble, who are sick with infections and nursing diseases made worse by neglect.

    “We can’t save everyone, but we’re trying to save as many as we can,” Etienne says. “Haiti’s going to be rebuilt. It really is. And some of these people are going to help rebuild it.”

  3. D. E. Reddick permalink
    January 26, 2010 9:06 pm

    Aarrrggghhh!

    The Norks are at it again. And ROK forces returned fire. This would seem to be in the same western sea border region as the recent naval conflict occurred.

    Report: 2 Koreas fire artillery along coast

    SEOUL, South Korea – Yonhap news agency says that the militaries of North and South Korea have exchanged artillery fire along their disputed western sea border.

    Yonhap reported that the North fired several rounds of land-based artillery off the west coast Wednesday, two days after it designated two no-sail zones along the sea border.

    Yonhap, citing no source, said South Korea’s military returned fire. The report didn’t provide further details.

    South Korea’s Defense Ministry said it couldn’t immediately confirm the report.

    The western sea border is a constant source of military tension between the two Koreas. Their navies fought a brief yet bloody gunbattle in November that left one North Korean sailor dead and three others wounded.

    THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea issued two no-sail zones near its disputed western sea border with South Korea, officials said Tuesday, a possible indication the country may be preparing to conduct missile tests.

    The no-sail zones were designated just south of the western maritime border — in South Korean-held waters — from Monday through March 29, said a South Korean Defense Ministry official on condition of anonymity, citing department policy.

  4. Scott B. permalink
    January 26, 2010 7:25 am

    Mike Burleson said : “Looks like the dinos aren’t extinct after all!”

    To paraphrase Mark Twain (with a little bit of Naval Newspeak for good measure) :

    “Giant Hospital Battleships ? The reports of their death are greatly exaggerated.”

    AIGF ;-))

  5. Mike Burleson permalink*
    January 25, 2010 8:08 pm

    Thanks again as always D.E. I read on one of the blogs that at one time the Comfort was called a “dinosaur”. Looks like the dinos aren’t extinct after all!

  6. D. E. Reddick permalink
    January 25, 2010 7:38 pm

    As noted over at the USNI Blog, the crew and capacity for providing care aboard USNS Comfort are now being overwhelmed. And as has been stated on the USNI Blog, it would appear to be past time to activate Comfort’s sister-ship USNS Mercy. Also, it would seem there’s a need to bring into availability other hospital ships with comparable capabilities.

    Time to Activate the USNS Mercy (T-AH-19)!

    http://blog.usni.org/2010/01/25/time-to-reactivate-the-usns-mercy-t-ah-19/

    The cause of this concern is the following news report by the Baltimore Sun’s reporter Robert Little, who is aboard Comfort. A portion of his report follows:

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bal-md.comfort25jan25,0,6795241.story

    Comfort’s ability to help stretched to limit

    Too many need attention for ship to take them all

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – Nat Segaren drove his truck across the stink and rubble of the city in search of a last chance, four injured people stretched out on dirty blankets in the back.

    He found it at the waterfront, where a triage team from the USNS Comfort looked at his passengers and agreed to take three but declined a partially paralyzed man with a brain injury – he would require too much of the floating hospital’s resources and still probably would not survive.

    Segaren thanked them, helped transfer the patients, then climbed back into his truck to drive off with his fourth passenger, who now was all but officially a dead man.

    “I know there’s nothing anyone can do,” said Segaren, who works for a pediatric HIV program in Haiti and has been caring for 18 critical earthquake victims at a community hospital southwest of the city. “But I thought I would take a chance. The last-ditch attempt is to bring them to the Comfort.”

    The largest and most capable hospital in Haiti today, the Comfort is reaching its breaking point in ways that Segaren’s dying passenger underscores.

    The ship’s space and supplies are overtaxed, forcing the crew to contemplate declining new admissions. The injuries are so abundant and severe that an otherwise acceptable caseload is unmanageable, forcing providers to choose between declining care and forgoing rest and food.

  7. D. E. Reddick permalink
    January 24, 2010 3:21 pm

    There’s a new Visby corvette thread over at Military Photos. It begins with two Kockums videos featuring the Visby class and its composite construction technique. The first video is very informative (underwater explosive shock-test footage of composite hulls and components is included). The second video is much shorter and is more in line with being eye candy of fast-moving Visbys.

    http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?173057-Visby-Corvettes-videos

  8. D. E. Reddick permalink
    January 22, 2010 8:11 pm

    Mike,

    More can be found in posting # 122 of this thread about the QE class CVs at Military Photos. Oh, that’s a ship section of the future RN Type 45 DDG HMS Duncan in the background.

    http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?163878-Queen-Elizabeth-Class-Aircraft-Carriers-News-and-Discussion/page9

  9. Mike Burleson permalink*
    January 22, 2010 7:15 pm

    D.E. Thanks. A great scoop!

  10. D. E. Reddick permalink
    January 22, 2010 3:44 pm

    Found a picture of the future RN aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth under construction (note another apparent warship section under construction in an adjacent space). Just scroll down to posting # 32 of the following link from Military Photos – it’s the first picture. Also, the following imagery show UK forces in an amphibious training operation.

    http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?172923-Today-s-Photos-Friday-January-22st-2010/page3

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